Blog

A Moment With: Kristin Holland

by Ian Sputnik

Kristin Holland is a podcaster, voice actor, voice over artist, actor, and professional musician based in Melbourne, Australia. Currently he’s in his second year of running his fortnightly, short horror podcast Nocturnal Transmissions and regularly appears in other productions such as Justintertainment’s Yowie and the US based Simply Scary Podcast.

We took a moment to sit down with Holland, and ask him about his work, his love for horror, and what got him interested in voice work. Continue reading “A Moment With: Kristin Holland”

Toadstools And Magick: A Horror Writer’s Field Guide To Tir Na nOg

by Brooke Warra 

Dryads, banshees, and sirens, oh my!

Welcome to the first instalment of Toadstools and Magick: A Horror Writer’s Field Guide to Tir Na nOg. Here, we are going to explore the vast and rich world of the fae folk. Fairy tales have long been a part of human culture, worldwide. We tell these stories to teach lessons, give warnings, and to entertain. Fairy tales are a horror writer’s best friend! They explore the darker side of our world, mortality, and human intention. Plenty of modern stories and films find their roots in these classic tales. Continue reading “Toadstools And Magick: A Horror Writer’s Field Guide To Tir Na nOg”

Review: Burke’s ‘The Weird: A Strange Novella’ Is A Lot More Than Just That

by Brooke Warra

The Weird is dangerous.

The Weird is not meant for you. So it says on the first two pages, a stark warning, of which you should not pay any heed. Go forth, reader.

The Weird is not a book. It is an experience. It is noir on an acid trip. It’s what happens when style and gore have a baby. It’s nihilistic transgressive experimentalism on a frenzied binge. Continue reading “Review: Burke’s ‘The Weird: A Strange Novella’ Is A Lot More Than Just That”

Penny For Your Thoughts: Varney The Vampire, Or The Feast Of Blood

by Ian Sputnik

The legend of vampires snakes back through the ages. Bram Stoker is widely regarded as the creator of modern vampire mythology as we know it today. His talent for taking the vampire legend and mixing it with the dark—but true—history of Vlad the Impaler, and centering the narrative around a love triangle encapsulates most of the elements we call to mind when we think about this genre of horror. And so in 1897 Dracula was first unleashed upon the world. Continue reading “Penny For Your Thoughts: Varney The Vampire, Or The Feast Of Blood”

Review: Alex Garland’s Stunning ‘Annihilation’ Brings Body Horror To Mainstream Audiences

by Brooke Warra

While many horror fans have known for some time the rich, beautiful, and often horrifying world of body horror in literature, we have very rarely witnessed it in mainstream cinema. John Carpenter gave us The Thing, arguably one of the best horror films of all time. And let’s not forget Jeff Goldblum and Geena Davis’ performances in David Cronenberg’s The Fly. But most of our favourite body horror films have been small productions with cult followings (i.e. Teeth, Tusk, and the delightfully disgusting Contacted). Continue reading “Review: Alex Garland’s Stunning ‘Annihilation’ Brings Body Horror To Mainstream Audiences”

Why Exorcisms Will Always Be Part Of Horror

by Ian Sputnik

Horror literature has often imbibed folklore and myth into its storylines. Werewolves, vampires, demonic possession, and ghosts being the main topics. Even today, most works of dark fiction have their roots extensively and intrinsically linked to these mythologies. True, there have been new themes that have grown to be part of the classics (aliens being the most recent addition to the stable of classic horror monsters). Continue reading “Why Exorcisms Will Always Be Part Of Horror”

Review: Wytovich’s ‘Sheet Music To My Acoustic Nightmare’ Is Dark, Personal, And Impossible To Put Down

by Brooke Warra

Poetry, as with most writing, often comes from a place of deep pain. That’s never been more evident than with Stephanie M. Wytovich’s Sheet Music To My Acoustic Nightmare. As you’re reading, you get the sense you’re leafing through the pages of the author’s diary. It’s an intensely personal work. Wytovich deftly translates the horrors of real-life into gritty, gorgeous verse. Continue reading “Review: Wytovich’s ‘Sheet Music To My Acoustic Nightmare’ Is Dark, Personal, And Impossible To Put Down”

Penny For Your Thoughts: A Penny Dreadful Retrospective

by Ian Sputnik

England in the early 19th century was a violent place. The Napoleonic wars had only just been concluded. The streets were a spewing gutter of prostitution, gang culture, and theft. Murder was rife. The industrial age was starting to give steady employment to the masses and putting a bit of money in the common people’s pockets. One might think that the often violent surroundings would lead to people wanting to escape their reality with a more pleasant one, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Instead, young men had a thirst for violence and relished in it. And, with the upturn of literacy, the Penny Dreadful publications were born. Continue reading “Penny For Your Thoughts: A Penny Dreadful Retrospective”